Little (Whilly) Tern

Iain Oughtred


 

The Shetland Ness Yoles and Sixerns were a strong influence in these designs, with their wonderfully shapely and seaworthy hulls. However a recreational boat would have to have different hull form and less external keel; therefore it was felt that t new design should not imitate an old type, but should be worked out to suit her purpose as well as possible, absorbing as much of the tradition as appropriate, without it being forced upon her. In the end, I think they look quite Shetlandish, without being presumptuous.

This is the MkII Whilly Boat, which was originally thought of as a sailing/rowing boat, so she had a little higher deadrise and narrower waterline than is ideal for sailing. But no one seems to row them much, and some feel they are a bit tender under sail - until they get a little ballast into them. Subsequent experience with the longer boats had me thinking they could be made into something with more graceful lines and proportions; a little more stable for better sail carrying, with many refinements and more options in their layout, and more details of the rig. 

Construction is simplified glued lap clinker plywood, with a wide bottom plank and three topside strakes. This is much the same as the dory construction, with a keel but without the frames. Built-in buoyancy is optional, with some decking fore and aft, below sheer height.

Little (Whilly) Tern 2nd image